Walmart: Modern Indentured Service

Surprisingly, I’ve had people defend Walmart’s business ethics and tactics in regular conversation before. I’ve heard people brush off egregious wrongs against society as being “the norm” or “acceptable, or even necessary business practice”. I’m here to tell you; those people are assholes.

Walmart destroys the working class. This is undeniable. Those who are forced into an employer/employee relationship with Walmart (usually due to a serious lack of options, as Walmart destroys small businesses), are always on the suffering end. Walmart profits greatly from employing people they have no intention of giving raises, insurance, or potential for advancement. What is also interesting, but not surprising, is that many female Walmart employees are beginning to discover that their male counterparts are making more money doing the same jobs that they are.

Walmart doesn’t give a rat’s ass about you, me, or society. This one, to me, seems like a no brainer. All of the community garbage you see posted on the walls of each Walmart store is essentially a shield. It’s public relations nonsense to keep people shopping, despite the incredibly poor working conditions suffered by those who are unable to obtain gainful employment. Walmart, from highest tiers of management, to the lowest of low, knows the score. Everyone knows the drudges of Walmart are mistreated and expendable. It’s common knowledge at this point. How else can they operate so many large stores with the lowest cost of overheard since the laying of the Pacific Railroad?

I don’t know. I doubt any negative press will change how Walmart does business. If anything, it will simply remind people that Walmart exists (should they forget), and that there will always be a place they can obtain what they desire for a low price. It’s pathetic, but it’s human nature. It can only get worse when people defend it. When people become complacent. When they are no longer outraged to any extent.

Walgreed

24 Nov 2012 11:08 | walmart, economy, dilution, slavery
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